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20130113
20130121
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CSPAN2 4
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
on the order of one, 1.5% visual, quite significant drag on economy. at the same time with quite a bit to do to address our long-term sustainability issues. a lot more work to do, let me be very clear about that. but it's going to be a long haul. it's not going to happen overnight. basically because the government budget represents the values and priorities of the public, and decisions been made about what to spend on, what you tax and so on are very difficult and contentious decisions that will take some time to address. >> well, those is to use -- those issues of course are not the specific purdy of the fed, and so why do we shift gears and talk more specifically about some things that the fed is doing and things that the fed might do. perhaps a way to introduce that is to say that the fed of course is keeping interest rates at close to zero since roughly 2008, and it dug pretty deep into its arsenal, more recently in terms of in particular the very massive asset purchases recently launched its third round, which are intended to bring long-term interest rates. can you tell us how well you
the economy, you know, recover as subsequently as well. i think that's what we've been seeing across the region as far as policies are concerned in that they are more responsive and more, i suppose, willing to adapt should be a quick change or shift in consumer sentiment because that will have an impact on growth very quickly in a subsequent month. >> seng wun, australia has had a difficult time determining just where their sector is heading in mining. is it simply now the onus is becoming more clear? >> well, yeah. i think the last six or eight months have given policymakers some degree of confidence in that the picture from europe is stable. the risk is fairly high, there will be more problems ahead, but the determination says policymakers in europe to stay on top of this situation, give confidence to policymaker here and the u.s. is -- and, again, asia, china, it's anchoring growth here and policy is coming up on china is also towards some degree of small, stable growth rather than full speed ahead. so that gets everyone else a little bit more flexibility with regard to fiscal pol
coming this week. joining us now is jeff clinetopp at lpl financial. on the economy, dick hoey. jeff, it's going to start with you because i'm interested to see we could have not just a lower than expected increase in earnings this year, but maybe even a negative year since aus thegs companies and profit margin is were peaking. is it possible the s&p earnings do not grow this year? >> there's a distinct possibility earnings don't grow. our expectation is they grow a very small amount, but a lot of that is coming from share buyback these year. this quicker alone is a testament to that. this fourth quarter, supposed to be the lowest earnings dollar total for any of the quarters of last year. that's not the way it's supposed to work. fourth quarters is supposed to be the highest earnings total. but we've got that uncertainty lingering for 2012. this week, we'll hear from a lot of the fms. they have the highest earnings expectations for 2013. mortgages are doing well. but the less favorable -- >> and we know how difficult it has been to grow revenues year over year. so that's difficult and y
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
administration, it didn't happen in one fell swoop to get our economy in great shape and move toward a balanced bump started off with three phases. started with president bush's actions, the first president bush, in terms of taxation, before president clinton took office. then the actions the president took in '94 and then in '97. well, we think there's a third phase here that can set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a
in the second half of this year, we could start seeing some economies get traction again. of course, some of the very badly hit economies like greece, it will take longer. but europe i think should improve. >> the chairman and ceo of mercedes-benz joining us first on cnbc. the e-class rollout here earlier today. i'm not sure that i have ever seen an unveiling with as many people as were jammed in here to the mercedes stand today here in detroit. back to you. >> that is a big deal, phil. you've seen your share of unveilings, that's for sure. phil lebeau in treat today. one food company on the move, let's get to kayla tausche who is manning the market flash desk. >> watching flowers foods. that's a southern food company, flo. about $4 billion in market cap, that stock up more than 6% hitting an all-time high on its first trading day after signing an agreement to acquire the majority of the bread businesses from hostess brands. that includes wonder bread. of course we're still waiting for some of the other bidders for some of the other units to be announced. right now flowers is the bid to b
that we have a uniform rule of economy gent circumstances. that, her suggestion complies with your objection. >> well, if i'm understanding it correctly, i think our point is this, which is that the police officers have to act reasonably in the situation. in the situation they know for sure the evidence is going to be lost, they know that every minute is critical, for example -- >> so many situations in which we require a warrant, nevertheless. when there's drug dealing in a house, every time -- it's almost a certainty that they're going to use the drugs, and that evidence is going to disappear. you rely on knowing that there's likely to be telltale signs left over. and that's the same thing you do in an alcohol situation. you rely on the testimony of the police officer, you rely on the implied consent presumption. it's not as if this is destruction of all evidence. and not like a fleeing situation where someone gets away, you have nothing left. this is vastly different. >> i mean, with respect we disagree. this evidence is critical, and the number matters. i mean, it is the case t
to answer questions at the university of michigan. we will let you know what he's saying about our economy and the future fed action. as we know that can be market moving. this event could move the markets tomorrow. david: that's a live picture coming out of michigan. we will be going right back there. also the news of apple cutting down orders for iphone parts is driving the stock way down again today. we have an apple analyst who cut his price target by 150 bucks back in december. does he think it's also time for the company to cut their ceo tim cook? sandra: shares of dell soaring on talk of a buyout. more on both tech stories coming up. keep it right here. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen anjeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they' gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforrd guidance and be a
.s. economy and japan nikkei was up only slightly and they look to the yen as a good sign for exports. trading yesterday, the dow jones industrial average started today at 13511 and right now it looks like a little bit of a higher opening across the board for all three major index. apple gained more than 4% closed at $500 a share boosting the nasdaq. apple's stock is down 28% from its all-time high last september but the cupertino based company remains worth $471 billion and right now it looks like it will trade up to $2 a share this morning. >>> on the bay area, movies about steve jobs and they are about to premier. >>> a great white shark encounter caught on tape by some nervous fishermen, how long it stuck around their boat. >>> and plus you can get the morning's top stories while you are sleeping send straight to your cell phone at 6:00 a.m. text the word wake up by 70123. iyin)Ñ)ogóçÑóçíç'Ñy?oo . >>> two australian fishermen had a good look at a great white. they were fishing when this big guy circled their boat bouncing along the side of their boat even putting its nose on the e
investors more optimistic about the economy. the dow is up 69. the nasdaq is up 18. s&p up 7. >>> an influential group of business leaders is pushing for an increase in the full retirement age. the business round table made up of large company's ceos -- companies' secretary of state, says the retirement age should gradually go up to 70. the group is proposing the older retirement age apply for both social security and medicare. members also want to partially privatize healthcare for older americans. they say their plan to help preserve social security and medicare for all americans. >>> 8:44. let's bring you up to date on some of the other top stories we're following for you right now. algerian forces reportedly raided a natural gas plant trying to free dozens of foreign hostages including americans held by militants. but the militants say 35 hostages and 15 kidnappers were killed by algerian military helicopters. they also say that seven hostages including two americans survived. no comment yet on this by the algerian government. >>> back this country, notre dame football st
the economy of louisiana expand, and basically progress. >> he's saying if you make louisiana a great place to come, companies will come. >> yes. >> peter: and people will have work? >> yes. >> peter: but the trade-off is, higher sales tax. so the question today is, that a regresssive tax? >> yes. >> peter: as you economists say? >> yes. >> peter: what does that mean? >> everybody pays it. no relation to how much you earn. it's how much you spend. you pay tax according to what you spend. a sales tax, it tax consumption. so in that sense, yes. it is regresssive. but on the other hand, if the absence of income taxes creates a growing economy, everybody wins from that. >> peter: some states don't have income tax. >> there are seven. i'll read them, alaska, florida, nevada, south dakota, texas, washington, and wyoming. on the map. these states have no income taxes at the state level. louisiana wants to become the eighth state and north carolina, may become the ninth state. even oklahoma, they, too, are considering getting rid of personal income taxes at the state level. >> peter: these are in s
of the created conglomeration of the economy looks like for those and students here at the school of public health taught me about these opportunities to quantify attitudes towards conflict and aggression and we were able to show with a fall of 28 days surveys before and after the intervention that there was a short term improvement in those attitudes and that is in my talking and academic arena prevention outreach added to the conflict and aggression, 98 kids cross 13 months and then i was invited to go to new york. mayor bloomberg isn't here but mtv executives invited me to a video that had an antiviolence fema and i said that interests me let me see that. well, this was about eight years ago. my 15 year old was then 7-years-old but i didn't know much about 50-cent, the rapper that had this ongoing dual with jarule come and 50 have more credibility why? i told the story 150 times and shot nine times he has more credibility. but does that say about our culture of violence? taking credit by the way being shot nine times. [applause] the video that i salles enrage me to it was the same cultur
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12